TSAA Archery News
Issue 51 - BEST and More
August 29, 2005

In this newsletter:
The BEST Way?
Hosford Funds Avaliable to Texas Archers
Tip of the Month
Over 50 Years Of Age? Still Got Game?
121st NAA National Target Championship
Zack Kolda Benefit Shoot
Murderball
What Does Archery Cost?
Which Colleges and Universities Support Archery
A New Use For Easton 2514s...

 
 
The BEST Way?


The BEST (Biomechanically Efficient Shooting Technique) is now being taught by the NAA in level III and IV certification courses. In a few short words, the BEST way or method is an emphasis on using the human body's structure in the best way possible to deliver an arrow where you want it.

Simply changing the emphasis on the way we use bones as well as muscles will insure the most efficient and effective execution for ALL archers, especially our younger archers. And yes, this advanced technique is appropriate for JOAD beginners if taught by coaches certified in the BEST method. In fact, I feel certain our future Olympians will come from the ranks of BEST-enhanced JOAD archers, and that retention of archers in the sport will increase as a result of BEST.

Does it work? Yes. Definitely. The most successful group of archers today, the Koreans, use many of the aspects of the BEST technique. Simon Fairweather in Sydney used it.  More importantly, elite American archers such as Guy Krueger and Lindsey Carmichael (disclaimer: daughter of author) have been working for more than a year with Don Rabska to incorporate BEST. Guy just won the US Open and is shooting more consistently now than ever before. Lindsey shot a FITA score of 1250 on her way to a silver at the 2005 Texas Shootout, and a 1249 at the Arizona Cup a few weeks after, both much higher scores than ever before. This method can and does work, for compound as well as recurve.

Be on the lookout for seminars or courses offered by those certified in the BEST method (i.e., NAA level III and IV coaches) and take advantage of them! Guy Krueger is traveling to various parts of the country to provide seminars, and these are a very good way to get started- go if you can.

Lancaster Archery still has a few copies of "Total Archery" by KiSik Lee, which is the most complete reference for the BEST method so far. It's not listed, you need to call them - 1.800.829.7408 in the U.S.


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Hosford Funds Avaliable to Texas Archers
A reminder about the TSAA Hosford Foundation Loans
This is a reminder about the availability of loans to help start up archery clubs around the state of Texas. From the Hosford guidelines:

"The Texas State Archery Association (TSAA) is pleased to offer its member organizations the opportunity to submit grant application proposals for consideration. Grant proposals are due to the TSAA secretary by December 31. Announcement of successful applications will be done at the TSAA state indoor tournament. "

More information can be found on an acrobat file at this link...


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Tips of the Month
By Rick Stonebraker

"Do you have a loose screw?"
If you are using a Cavalier Tab, it is a good idea to tighten the screws from time to time. They will come loose and they will get lost.

To further ensure they don't fall out, put a small dab of Fletch-Tite on the threads before tightening.

"Do you have good, working tabs?"
Also on the subject of tabs, during the off-season is a good time to break-in another new tab. It is always a good idea to have more than one tab and a good idea to have more than one tab ready to go. I currently have three tabs, all of them are broke in and one is about wore in too much so it is time to change the leather to a new piece and I will start to break that one in for the upcoming season.

"Do you have good shooting form?"
While breaking in a new tab, this is a good time to work on your form. Stand in front of the bale and work on form. You are not concerned with shooting a score or even hitting the center of the target. Probably best to avoid a target face and work on form and work on timing.

"Practice"
One of the exercise I do to work on form and still aim at something goes like this: pick a distance you are comfortable with indoors - for me it is 11 yards because that is the distance from the dining room, through the living room and into the back end of the garage. Yes, I do shoot through the house and into the garage. Pick a spot on the bale and shoot an arrow. Then move your windage a little so that when you aim at the nock of the arrow in the target, the next shot will go an inch or so left or right, depending on which way you turn the sight. You shoot an arrow, then aim at the previous nock. Shoot another arrow and then aim at the previous nock. If you are shooting well, you will have a horizontal line of arrows. You can shoot across the target to your right or you can shoot across the target to your left or change it up and go one way one time and another way the next time. It breaks up the momentary of practice and still affords you some decent training. When you get the hang of that routine, then do the same with up or down and if you want to try some real skills, do a combination of left/right up/down by shooting diagonal across the target. This will keep you from wearing out a target and keeps you from piling arrows into each other.

"Moving Sight"
Another skill I picked up over the years is what happens after the clicker goes off? I was working out of town a few years ago and could not shoot in the place where I was living but I practiced aiming anyway. What I did was put a target on the wall and practiced my draw. I was able to "Not shoot" when I got through the clicker but I realized that when the clicker went off, the sight was not on the target so it made me think "what was happening" when the clicker went off. So, I went through a practice scheme where I aimed at the target and when the clicker went off, I did not release the arrow but kept the mental image of what happened to that sight. This is where the follow-through came into play. You have to be able to concentrate on the target AFTER the clicker goes off and AFTER you release the shot. I have an article "
FINISH THE SHOT" that goes into this more in detail. Frank Pearson talks about this concept of shooting every other arrow in practice. Shoot an arrow and on the next shot, pull through the clicker but do not shoot the arrow and see where the sight is when the clicker goes off. It will teach you that you need to maintain the sight on the target, even when you let go of the string. It will only be for a split second, but you can tell. Also, this will help you maintain control of an arrow when the clicker goes off. Many times when you are shooting, it comes to a point where you are not on the center of the target or you are holding too long and your mind says to abort the shoot but a mili-second after you thought that, the clicker goes off as you are in the center of the target. You need to learn to control the shot and set it down and start over. Many times I have done this - I tell myself to start over and the clicker goes off anyway but I already set my mind to put the arrow down and it doesn't matter if the clicker goes off or not, I can control the fingers. There are other times that I just had trouble getting through the clicker and I said to myself to start over. I will purposefully draw real hard through the arrow and make it click but have no inkling to accidentally let go of the string. You have to maintain control over your equipment. You rule the equipment, it does not rule you!

"Laser pointer"
One way to do the above is buy a cheap laser and tape it to your stabilizer. You will need a second person for this. While you are aiming at the target (without an arrow so as not to shoot your helper), have someone else put up a target face where the laser is pointing. Then while they are practicing, you can watch the trace of the laser beam to see what kind of movement you have. There are some expensive software/hardware out there to where one can hook up to the bow and able to trace the pattern on a screen and even keep track of the movement but I do not think it is available to an individual.

"Drifting"
Another exercise that I came up with is shooting with the eyes closed. Aim at a target and as soon as you are on the center of the target, close your eyes and finish the shot. The idea is to see what happens to the bow movement. With your eyes open, your arm will always try to aim in the center of the target. But, with your eyes closed, your arm relaxes and moves (hopefully doesn't move) in a natural fashion.
Jim Wimberly had a hand in this exercise as he claims that in rifle shooting, a simple movement of the foot one way or another will slow down this drifting.

Rick Stonebraker


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Over 50 Years Of Age? Still Got Game?
Stop! Don't set up your indoor bow just yet. The Texas Senior Games start September 24th in Austin, and they have archery as a competition!!! The deadline for registering is September 1st and for archery there is no pre-qualification events. You can SHOOT an American Round in Austin!
For information on the Archery portion of the Senior Games,
click here .

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121st NAA National Target Championship

The just-concluded NAA Target Championship was the 121st and was a true test of the archers' ability. The first few days were in the 90s, and the last few were in the 50s, temperature-wise. Winds at times were very high, and rain during the cold days was frequent.
Several hundred photos are posted on the TSAA website, and the daily bulletins from the NAA are also included on the
index page of photos for the event, which has had more than 6,000 hits so far. Full results were quickly available each day as well as after the event, on the USA Archery's website at this link. Colorado Springs, home of the NAA and the USOC, turned out to be a pretty good place to have the shoot - it has an ample mix of non-competitive attractions, the field was very good, and the weather was no worse than at past locations. If you have the opportunity, plan to attend this tournament next year!

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Zack Kolda Benefit Shoot

Zack was killed in action in Iraq not too long ago. The Austin Archery Club will host a benfit shoot at their range on Sunday September 18th. California walk up start beginning at 8:00am.
To read more about Zack,
use this link, and for information on the club, use this link.

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Murderball
(Mark Zupan)

This is not about archery, but is about athletes in wheelchairs playing rugby. If you are not 100% aware of paralympic athletes and what they do, this movie will be very entertaining and educational at the same time. It is in full release in movie theaters around the country, and it is worth tracking down. Here's more information on MURDERBALL.

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What Does Archery Cost?
Aaron Cross, Bronze medalist in Athens 2004 Paralympics, has provided a very good estimation of expenses related to the task of making the Olympic Village in Beijing your temporary home in 2008. To read more, click this link....

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Which Colleges and Universities Support Archery

About a year ago the X Files, the NAA's JOAD Newsletter, had an article concerning the colleges and universities of the U.S. that actively permit or even support (surprise!) archery for its students... I updated the page and made it a primary page with a link on the left-hand border of the website. To read this page, and find out more about the Clarke Sinclair Memorial Archery Scholarship program, go to this link.....

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A New Use For Easton 2514s...
"Ya'll laughed when I started shootin' them Easton 2514 "logs" 'bout ten years ago, but I wanna tell ya, they're the greatest. Yesterday morning' I woke up and found the gas furnace had decided to take a vacation to Cancun, or Aruba. My thoughts were that the furnace folks had made enough money this year already, 'sides that I hadn't shopped for Christmas yet, so I decided to trouble-shoot the problem m'self...... This fascinating and entertaining story, by Robert Michael (Mad Mikey) Stewart is continued at this link....

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