Category Archives: Training

Topics of training issues

Going with the flow.

I’ve been posting clips from a book to my Kindle Amazon highlights file.  This book deals with the more esoteric aspect of coaching, MENTAL development.

If you read through this post, you’ll be rewarded with the name of the book and a link to it on  Amazon.

It’s normal for the archer to want to “work on” something everytime she shoots.  We all want to be better at what we do, and the physical aspect is right in front of the brain.  But if you are familiar with periodization, a means of physical training optimization, you may not have extended the concept beyond the physical.   I like that the notion deals with MENTAL periodization also.

Don’t just work on “something” every time you go out.  Set one day of practice out of every 7 that you shoot, to just shoot.  But instead of working on that release, or that transfer, holding, relaxed wrist, etc., you can choose to become complete null mentally.

Look, if you have been shooting for more than a few months, you have begun to myelinize your shot pathways.  It’s time for you to trust yourself and well, trust in the force, Luke.

Follow your normal shot mechanism conscientiously, carefully, till right before you go to the “up” position, (set to set-up).  When you have gotten to that point, you are ready to engage autopilot, and perhaps think of nothing in particular.  Emit a mantra, an “ommmmm” loud enough to hear between your ears.  Think of a polar bear in a snow storm.  Or, like one of the most successful female compound archers ever, visualize green legos.    Just don’t work on anything in the physical realm, think only of smoothness.  ease.  flow.

The goal is to relax and let your body take its course.  Disconnect from the desire to determine the results through force. Instead, learn how to go with the flow of your body’s natural abilities to complete the actions of delivering the arrow into the air.    Like visualization, going with the flow takes practice and clever desire.

The book?  ok, you’ve earned it…

Golf Flow  by Gio Valiente

Remember, as with several other excellent golf books you need to substitute the word golf with archery, ignore the sand traps, and think of how what he writes can apply to your particular desires to be a better archer/golfer.

PS: Are most archers practicing mental strengths, such as visualization?  Not so much.  Despite champions uniformly praising the skill development of visualizing as key to their success, I find it is amazingly difficult to persuade athletes to develop this skill. The students I coach that have given themselves over to this notion have become much happier with their abilities and performances.  In archery, the power of the mind will exceed the power of the body given a chance to do so.  This book in great part has mental strengths in well, mind.  :)   Well written, and I recommend it only for those who can trust in their mental force.

In times of pure stress and duress, when hitting the spider is the strongest desire in mind, allowing the subconscious to rule will win out, provided the athlete has laid the foundation for succeeding with flow by practicing the nothingness of the perfect unconscious release.  Wow, how zen is that?

Look Here.

Many of the topics I am moved to share thoughts on come from my students, primarily my college students. :)

When an archer has a miss (not “if”; as EVERY archer will have a miss) it apparently needs must involve some coaching to speed the process of retrieving the arrow(s).

The vast majority of normal missed shots will only miss the bale by inches, rather than yards.  (Not talking about missfires/shoot-through-the-clicker/letting-down-and-shot-anyway/triggered the release whoops early kind of events)

As such, the arrow will fall within a narrow cone or rectangle that barely is wider than the alley the bale sits in.  Yet time and again I’ll watch archers search 5, 10, or 20 yards to the side of the bale for the arrow which will almost certainly be found BEHIND the bale…Teach your archer to note mentally how the arrow missed. Was it to the side because the wind came up/quit right at release?  Was it on the plunger and launched OVER the bale?  It can make a great impact on the limited time we often have to work with the archer if too much time is wasted “in the green”.  And first, exhaust the possibility that it is within a narrow rectangle about the width of the darn target bale!  Only after that, go searching wider afield…

And teach them to go to the target, go ten or twenty feet further, and then take a sight on their scope’s tripod way back on the shooting line, so they have a sense of where the arrow traveled FROM and to….finding an arrow in the turf should not be rocket science and it should not take all day.

How well do you know your plunger?

It’s amazing how many archers do not understand the nature of the Berger Button/Cushion Plunger and the center-shot setting.

If you are a recurve archer, have you ever taken the time and trouble to explore the effect on tune and arrow behavior which changing your center shot has?  Perhaps you should experiment so you understand cause-and-effect and can tune better.

Start by measuring exactly how “deep” your plunger is so you can put it back to it’s current location if you want to return there quickly and easily (iow, when you panic). :)

Now, whatever its depth was, unscrew the plunger and set it to be about HALF as deep as it was. This’ll be the starting point and you’ll gradually move it deeper (past its original position most likely).   If it is designed like the Beiter Plunger you can tighten the spring by rotating the shroud until there is NO give in the button.  KEEP TRACK OF HOW MANY 360 DEGREE TURNS AND CLICKS YOU HAVE TO GO TO LOCK THE BUTTON DOWN. Again, so that you can put it back where it was at any time.  If another brand, just use the matchstick trick, insert a matchstick or a toothpick, something that eliminates the action of the spring for this exercise.

I like to do this shooting exercise with bare shafts.  Fletchings/vanes only serve to disguise the effects you seek to understand.  Be sure you are close enough to keep the arrows on the bale! Put up a blank sheet of butcher paper with a dot to aim at, or use a fresh target so you can circle each end of arrows.    Assuming you can shoot 3 arrows and get a group, well… do so.  Note how the arrows fly (how much they skew sideways) and where they go relative to your aiming point.  After each three arrows, rotate the plunger IN 1/2 turn pushing the centershot deeper away from the riser, and watch the arrows “march” across the target bale.

At some point the arrows will fly better than they have been and keep getting better, cleaner in flight.  Then as you continue changing the center shot, they will start to fly worse.  Keep going for a few ends and simply educate yourself on how the arrows fly, how they look in the bale (esp. if a foam bale – if a straw bale the angle of the dangle is not so diagnostic).  Ultimately you want to return to that plunger setting of “best behavior”.  You then might wish to check this “center shot” position in the traditional, arrow-on-the-bow-and-look-down-the-center-of-the-limbs method just to see how far off it is from the “accepted perfect center shot” (where the edge of the string away from the riser is just touching the junction of the shaft and arrow point joint).  If there is a difference between the “ideal” and your empiric center shot I would suggest it is due to the spine of the arrows and most importantly your release technique.

So which is better?  The one that give you the best groups, of course.

Incidentally, you did the center shot first because it has the more profound, basic influence on the arrow compared to the spring tension, but the spring can have a huge effect on the shape and size of your grouping pattern.

SO, how about the plunger tension now?  same thing.  You will not know until you try all the settings, using the same “little bit at a time” method keeping track as you make half-turns on the tension.  Notice how certain areas of adjustment actually make big changes in the left-right arrow groups, and as you get close to the sweet spot, you get better groups.  But you have to decrease the number of clicks per change as you near the sweet spot or you might go right past it.  Again, this exercise is simply to learn what effect the plunger tension has on the flight of the arrows as well as the grouping.

There is no more commonly used, less understood, hardware on the olympic recurve bow than the plunger.  You can study the engineering and physics of it all day long, and never really understand what it’s good for.  Till you experiment a little…

 

 

Too Much Of A Good Thing

It takes a certain amount of intent to hold a bowstring while a shot is made. Most often the intent, the tension, has nothing in the real world to relate it to the job description, other than “I must not let go till I am ready”.

Seldom if ever does the coach pay appropriate attention to the amount of effort the archer chooses to expend in holding the string. Finger placement? Yes, we do teach that. Thumb and pinky location during the draw, flat relaxed string hand, fist knuckle under the boney jawline? Yes, we should be teaching this as well. But we should teach the athlete to be a minimalist when holding the bowstring!

When was the last time you taught an archer to find that minimal amount of effort to keep the string from slipping away? Chances are extremely good that your athlete is using too much, far too much, strength and effort to grip the bow string.

Ahh. That may be it. The archer should not GRIP the bowstring, merely hold it, hook it, with a static hook of fingers. Of the two verbs “grip” and “hook”, to me grip sounds like it intends more effort.

To walk the knife edge between too little and too much, one must find precisely where “too little” is.  Standing 5-10 ft from the blank bale, have the archer go through set, but only so far. Then align and create the gunbarrel while the hands are still only partially above “set” position, increase the draw slightly and allow the string/arrow to slip out of the bow and into the blank bale (no aiming!). The focus in the archer’s mind must be on minimal effort – just enough to not let slip till the draw is say, half-way. Do a dozen reps of this. Then the archer should draw a little further, say 3/4 of the way, letting slip while still moving to draw. If the archer does not have the string accidentally slip out a few times, he or she is using too much effort to hook the string and is instead holding it.

You are also insuring that the string hand wrist is bent in a relaxed direction. You can demonstrate this bend to your athlete by holding the hand and arm out in the “stop” gesture and simply let the hand droop down by relaxing the wrist.  This is the same wrist bend needed for drawing the bow in the NTS method. By the way, this bent wrist is visible in every picture of any astronaut asleep in zero gravity – a totally neutral/relaxed position.

Back to the drill – once you are sure the archer is balancing on the edge of “not enough strength to hold the string/arrow back”, allow the archer to go to a normal set, set-up, and draw, and the instant the archer reaches anchor, he should instantly relax the fingers. (no clicker at this point and don’t say, “let go”).

Have the archer repeat the “low resistance finger hook” (not GRIP) on several practice sessions, and then whenever you sense a slow release is happening. Lightning, explosive releases happen best when the archer is only hooking the string with 0.1 pounds of excess effort. Without training most archers pulling say, a 30 pound bow, use 40 or 45 pounds of effort to grip the string. Before the string can be loosed and the arrow let fly, the archer must somehow shed 15 or more pounds of gripping effort which takes too much time.  This is part and parcel of why many male archers think they have a great release at 48 pounds and a so-so release at 38 – at 48 pounds they are probably just barely able to hold that string<G> while at 38 they are overgripping by 50% excess effort…This excess must somehow be reversed in order to allow the string to slip away.

Young archers must be taught to be minimalists at controlling the string.  I often employ the visualization technique with the athlete – “let the energy flow from your hand through your arm and into your back, and HOLD it all there as you feel your arm relax and your back muscles power up”.

Holding the bowstring should never be a contest of power, but a demonstration of minimalism.  Crisp, explosive releases from from proper hooking in the front and holding in the back.

How Do You Know?

You wish to be a coach?   How do you know if you are a “coach”.

Do you effect changes in those athletes who trust you to speak truth and cause positive change?’

Simply, do you give more than you receive?

There is no way that a coach can be paid enough for what he does (said he, modestly)….  SO it is important that the “quid pro quo” have nothing to do with money.

Yes, a coach, you, must make a payment be worth what the payor feels it is worth.  One failing coaches often have is that they are afraid to charge a fee commensurate (equal to) what their benefit is worth.  So they charge nothing and send the message that their expertise is worth “nothing”.  So it is worth exactly what they wanted to relate it as.

How do you know you are a coach worth your salt?  Regardless of what you charge you can judge your worth by simply, do your subjects improve?   Do they respect you?  Do you exit the gym feeling that you have done good?

As a coach, often you can hope for nothing more.

Clearing The Mechanism, or FOCUS

More on this notion of training an athlete mentally.

Olympic Style Archery is routinely performed in quiet, much like the golf gallery as the golfer hits the ball –  kind of a hushed up close, sometimes a little noise from a nearby fairway.

Even at National Championships for archery, even for World Cup events (usually) the archers enjoy a respectful silence from the crowd as they make their shot.  The worst complaint regarding noise is from the archers who cannot shut out the camera shutter noise – click click click click click hundreds of a time during a shot cycle, which they might never have had to deal with until they get to a “big” event.  As you know, a camera’s motor-driven mechanical shutter can drown out the clicker on the riser if the coach has not trained the archer to sense the clicker’s actions (movement, tactile vibration, AND sound) in order to free the arrow to fly.  It can be VERY distracting to the unprepared archer!

That’s small peanuts compared to the show, the bigtime, the ultimate.  When an archer arrives in some foreign countries, and especially at the Olympics/Paralympics, the archer will perform before stands of thousands of partisan fans (the word “fan” derives from FANATIC, remember).  Those fans likely will NOT know the custom of “quiet” like you see when a tennis star is serving at Wimbledon, or a pro golfer is teeing one up.  They will likely have brought inflatable mylar tubes, cowbells, clackers, loud voices screaming hoarsely for THEIR archer’s shot as YOUR archer’s shot clock ticks down from 20 seconds…

What will your archer do?  What CAN you do?  During this last 2012 London Olympics, I saw a commercial where an asian archer’s coach is inches from her face, screaming at the top of his lungs as she executes shot cycles.   I thought, yeah, I did that.  I also sprayed an athlete with a water jet while she shot, not just to simulate rain but to distract her.  I banged pots together HARD and abruptly(not always constantly)  behind her, to startle her.  Of course, I yelled, screamed, and gestured into her visual field.  I played an audio track from a previous game, with a world-class announcer who actually inserted the archer’s name into the dialogue to help with visualization.  When it rained, we practiced.

I worked very hard on increasing the athlete’s ability to focus.  It became a keyword.  “Focus”.   I played a video for her that epitomizes what I wanted her to learn to do – to shut everything out when the next 20 seconds become “everything” to her last 8 years of dedication.

For your consideration, I present a copy of that video, which she called “corny”.  I thought for awhile on this, and decided, so what if it’s corny?  It works as an example, and it planted the seed in her mind that she could do the same…

I do not think I did my job as well that last time as I would do, were there to be a next time.  You can never do enough to prepare your athlete for 15,000 fans screaming their lungs out, but you can try.

Click to view the example of what *every* archer must be taught to do.  The “key” mnemonic phrase to trigger it can be different, but the athlete has to be able to do it.  Shut the crowd out. Zero in, focus on what is to be done.

Copyright Credit: This excerpt is from “For Love Of The Game”, with Kevin Costner from 1999 – it is only about 30 seconds in length but might be worth a lifetime of memories for the athlete that learns from it the concept of FOCUS. For the full movie, check here

Visionary Thinking, Part 3

Under the colored part of your eye, lies the ciliary muscle pictured here. Perhaps the most refined muscle in the human body.

Training the muscles up.

We train athletes to shoot an arrow from a bow in an extremely precise, reproduceable way.

We cross-train athletes, too.  We know through experience and science that training an athlete to have greater core strength for example, will result in a more stable upper platform, less aperture movement, especially in windy conditions.  Most coaches think nothing is unusual with this concept. I have never had an archer say, “the transverse abdominus muscles aren’t part of drawing a bow, so why bother?”  Once a coach explains it properly, the archer CAN gain more power over the shot cycle by using the TA muscle group to squeeze the grapefruit behind the belt buckle.

So why do we not train the singularly most sophisticated and powerful ciliary muscles?  Did you even know you COULD train the ciliary muscles?  Well, you can and we should.  I think that gaining the ability to focus perhaps 5 times faster, to accommodate for near objects with greater facility, perhaps even to increase an athlete’s depth of field to where both the aperture AND the target are in focus simultaneously, cannot be given enough importance.

How?  Thank you for wondering that.   In the book, Fixing My Gaze: A Scientist’s Journey Into Seeing in Three Dimensions  by Susan R. Barry , the applicability of this concept of training the ciliary muscle of elite archers struck me like a thunderbolt out of the blue.  You could say it was made clear to me as I read this remarkable story. Sue Barry is a neuroscientist who was more than 40 years old before she ever got to see the world as the other 99% do, in stereo vision.  By analogy, think of what it is like when you go to the IMAX 3D, put on a set of special glasses, and have things leap out of the flat screen and into the air, hovering before you.  We take this for granted in our normal lives.  Imagine a 24/7 world where you never get the glasses for the 3D movie!

Sue was not blind, not unable to see things.  She just couldn’t detect edges, depth, foreground and background, she could not see individual snowflakes in the air.

Now, she can.  Through some absurdly simple tools and some awesomely clever optometrists, she learned to see in 3D at an age when all of the medical doctors told her it was impossible.   She, and others like her, prove that it is never to late to enhance visual technique.

We already know that we can cause myelination of neural pathways in our athletes through deliberate practice and repetition, creating world-class elite performers out of mere teenagers (who are old enough that by this “common knowledge” cannot still have plastic cells in their brains, right?)  Wrong.

There are two kinds of eye doctors, in a general sense.  There are Opthalmologists, MDs, who have specialized in the eye and diseases thereof.  They are able to prescribe pretty much any drug they see fit for eye health.  You want someone to do a surgery on an eyeball, chances are it will be an opthalmologist.  In the days of yore, they were the only ones who could use eye drops that dilate your pupils in order to get a better peek inside the eye.

Opthalmologists will cut one of these muscles in an attempt to help the eyeballs line up so that stereovision can happen, be developed, in the brain.

The other kind of eye doc is an optometrist – Nowadays, they do have a number of drugs they can use in their role.   But perhaps because they used to have more restrictions, or perhaps because I don’t understand it at all, they have become much more likely to use physical therapy to find a solution to a vision problem (instead of surgery).

Your eyes must be able to go crosseyed on demand to see something that is only a few inches in front – say the clicker.  The aperture.  For the target, the eyes must diverge apart evenly and quickly to much less than the angle for really close things.  Most eyes will function normally, and with slight effort the athletes views these things “on demand” never realizing this is how vision works.  Most athletes DO have a certain depth perception that allows bow “attitude” to be seen in 3D, a critical part of shooting well.

There is no way to predict for any single archer how much benefit can be gained from training with the special kind of Optometrist that Sue Barry worked with.  Another point is that many people who think they have normal vision actually have defects that they don’t realize, but that COULD be trained out of them.  I know of a medalist who was found to have some coordination eye movement problems that could have improved the odds. I have been told by one of these specialists that there may be only 400 such optometrists in the entire world capable of performing this kind of training.

I see this as simply another opportunity for cross-training.  Imagine if a 1300 archer is found to have a limitation in eyesight that can be fixed – freeing that athlete to be better, to reach a potential that would not, could not, otherwise be achieved.  How much better? Well, how much is 1% better worth? 10%? 15%?  One cannot know, but getting the elite athlete’s muscles trained up is what coaches do.

Why do we not train the muscles of the only target detector system the athlete has?

 

 

It Doesn’t Matter If It’s Not Broke, Coaches Want To Fix It Anyway (Visionary Thinking, Part 2)

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.  “The difficult we do today, the impossible we accomplish tomorrow”  “We can make it better”  “We can rebuild him….we have the technology”(from the 6 million dollar man, that last quote).

How many different ways do coaches mess with every aspect of the archer? Whether it is broke or not, many coaches (and athletes) want to “fix it” to make “it” over into something better.   Fact is, this approach has a history of working, and I think the NTS is a fine example of this.  It deals with almost every part of the athlete possible except I have identified one incredibly essential muscle system in the body NOT part of the NTS.

In today’s archery sport development system, we have scientificasized just about everything but one!

I am proud (as a techie nerd type of a coach) to say that along with everything else we coaches in the USAA do, the National Training System (NTS) is the most scientifically devised method of teaching a series of coordinated movements in the delivery of a pointy stick with precision, bar none.  We teach our athletes to use muscle control in a vitally profound way and we teach our athletes how to do that in a very enlightened way thanks to head coach Kisik Lee.

Just as the hardware has been tweaked nearly out of all recognition to the English longbow of yore which was perfectly adept at doing its job, we are in the process of doing the same tweaking and analyzing and testing and developing of the human body that we’ve done (and are still doing) on the hardware that is the bow and arrow.  The scientists at the OTC (and every other one of the more than 200 countries that participate in the Olys) are constantly developing new tools to tweak and test, analyze and evaluate, the human body.

When I finished reading this book, I read it again immediately because I was instantly thunderstruck by a possibility I “saw” for the last big untouched tweakable thing of the archer’s body. I have never had anyone tell me that they were aware of this, and I nursed an illusion that this would confer an advantage to USA for at least an Olympiad – a cycle of 4 years that defines our metric of developmental excellence. (OK, I’ll agree it really is TWO cycles for fulminant development of an archer’s potential) We could have a huge competitive advantage, until everyone else caught up with us.

In all of my learning experiences at the OTCs including talking to the lead physician scientist in COS, in Coach Lee’s classes, in my coaching certifications, and in my educational processes, no one has ever undertaken what I was envisioning.  Of those few I have asked, none have had a similar awareness of what I was about. How exciting to think you have some idea of a relatively important concept no other person in the world has!

After I met with a specialist physician who evaluated my concept’s validity in a positive way, I was so excited I called the man I view in my mind as the foremost archery wise man, my own coach who allowed me to absorb and learn from him for years, to express my revelation and persuade him that this should IMMEDIATELY be scientifically investigated!  I had the doctor lined up who could conduct the study, I had the plan all mapped out to achieve a proper p-value, man! I was rarin’ to go!

His conviction, his reply-without-hesitation after my proposal was, “Hey, there is this blind guy from Korea that just set a world record! He’s legally blind!  So your idea is (stupid)…” well, he didn’t say stupid but he did not pull any punches in telling me I had nothing.  And how could I rebut his opinion in light of his fact that some blind guy sets a world record?  This can’t be, I thought, but hey, him being who he was, I could not doubt his words, his statement, his accuracy, his veracity.  True, in my clutched throat, I doubted him, but by metric of that same heart, he’s my master so I. shut. up.  I never lost hope but without his support and the financial support of a foundation to develop the method through scientific study I couldn’t see a path to develop it.

Two years later, in 2012 in London during the Olympics, the world finally learned the truth about this archer who was “legally blind”, who said he couldn’t wear glasses to help him see the target, yet by his scores were without doubt a world-class athlete/archer.  As the Olympic hype-fest press machine got into gear, the “legally blind archer” was eventually revealed to be having a joke on the world. Reported by the Associated Press, his coach actually laughed when asked if his archer was blind.  Turns out he can be classified as “legally blind” because he cannot focus up close, to read, easily.  He is extra-far-sighted, instead.  Blind close, an eagle eye at 70 meters!  Great joke on the world, I thought bitterly.  I suspect he probably doesn’t even need a spotting scope to see his nocks in the bale at 70 meters since he sees the target so much better than most.  And now that the joke is over, he DOES wear sunglasses.

This revelation means to me THAT my previous revelation from 2010 is still worth investigating and THAT it might be completely legitimate. THAT a study could still be performed, THAT it is highly likely that we are not finished fixing the human body when it comes to enhancing human performance delivering pointy sticks accurately 70 meters away into the 10 ring.

How exciting this is!  But wait, I still have no way to perform this, no financial backing to investigate and properly prove out, verify, my theory.  Perhaps the Carmichael Accommodation Method will be proven somewhere else, and they’ll have the joy of producing this quantum advance and naming it the Korean Method, part 5.  Dang.

Anyone have $14K to create the next 6 million dollar man?

Sunglassed! “The frames of my glasses block my sight”, or “Visionary Thinking, Part 1″

Man is a predator.  LIke other predators, our eyes are both facing the same direction, whereas prey have eyes on each side of the head looking outwards because this makes them safer from ….predators.

So we do best in athletic events (ergo, “hunting a paper target”) when we face our prey.  For archers this means turning the face to the target as much as possible.  This can be hard for several reasons, all of which are based in the body’s natural design.

First, joints are only as flexible in range of motion as the owner makes them.  If you carefully and cautiously press your range, usually the joint will gain in range. We call it “stretching”, and it must be done carefully to avoid microtearing muscles (or even MACRO TEARING!)

What is the best way to stretch your neck’s range of motion – improve the tendons, ligaments, muscles so they allow you to zero in on your prey better?  Swimming.  The crawl, where you float face down, flail away with your arms while you kick crazily, and periodically ROLL YOUR HEAD on your spinal axis to the side for a breath.

You need to roll your head to the same side you look to when shooting: Right hand archers should breath from their LEFT side.  Every breath is an opportunity to stretch your joints just a little, to become more comfortable doing this.  Plus your athlete is cross-training, a great thing.

Incidentally, most people have a favored side, a great range of motion, to one side or the other.  Why?  After a lot of reflection I concluded that people sleep on the stomach at least a little every night, some much more so.  And when on the stomach the head must roll to one side if you don’t want to suffocate.  This gives you the same repetitions as swimming does.  Try it and see if you don’t feel a tightness sooner to one side or the other as you look first left, then right, as far as you can.

OK, one last and fundamental reason your athlete is having trouble seeing the aperture while wearing glasses because the frame is “right in the way”.  The neck vertebra (“cervical”) are different than the other vertebra of the spine in one particular way.  They interlock in a way that increases stability and lessens the chance of breaking said neck.

bones of the neck

Image the head tilting forward (to the left in the picture) and see how the bones interlock but have room to arch. But not so much to the back(right side of pic), nor in a rotational way unless tilted to the left (forward).  Credt: eSpine

Want to verify this?  Assume a shooting stance, OR, just sit where you are but sit up, and raise your head as though you are putting your nose just a little up, to contact the bowstring, and turn your head towards the target and draw your airbow.  Turn your head as much as possible to the target till you reach your limit.  NOW, drop your nose down about an inch, and carefully observe how much more further you suddenly can turn your head in an easier way! An inch? maybe more?  Well past where the eyeglass frame would be! It will be “more” because the spurs of bone in the cervical vetebrae interlock more when your head is tilted back/up than when it is slightly rocked forward/down. Don’t allow the athlete to “nose-down” too far, of course.

One fact that USAA National Head Coach Kisik Lee identified during the implementation of his shooting method was that elite and accomplished archers who had never been able to wear glasses because the frame got in the way, were suddenly able to enjoy sunglasses.  They could because he teaches a method that is consistent with the importance of facing your prey, facing the target.

Every USAA coach will already know this, but for the rest: When your eyes are rotated to the extreme edge of your orbits, either left or right, your nervous system cannot, will not, maintain the same control of your muscles.  While shooting a bow, if you look out of the corner of your eye, in other words, you will be weaker and holding the string to anchor will actually be harder for you.  Ask a USAA coach to show you proof – it’s fun/funny.

Essentially, my position is that if someone complains about the frames being in the way or the edge of the glass distorting the target, the problem is NOT with the glasses, it is with the coach failing to teach the athlete a proper technique for getting the head into a “Prey/predator” relationship with the target.  We are predators. When shooting a bow, be like the lion sighting in on the antelope.  Or, like your cat looking at a bird through the window – their intensity can be incredibly obvious, and they NEVER watch a prey out of the corner of their eyes.  With good, natural reason.

SO swim some laps breathing out of the correct side.  Drop the chin just a little.  Push the range a little at a time, and soon you will be seeing clearly through your glasses.  Just don’t make them so dark you can’t see the target!

On Scientific Behalf Of Exercise

One of the best archers I ever met just showed up at the field right out of the blue.  I watched in curiosity as he remained aloof, apart, shooting at his own target foam block while UT students went about being, well, college students.

Let’s call him, well, Easy.  Easy would shoot his arrows from a full-blown archery kit setup, hitting target decently at 70 meters, and then set bow down, and RUN to the bale, pull, and RUN back.  Seriously.  This guy was dedicated.  I know him better now, and have tried to informally help him though we have never had a formal coach-student relationship.  He’s a marvelous human in many ways.

I have recently learned WHY he became an excellent archer so quickly, or at least, one reason why.  He exercised aerobically before he exercised anaerobically.  He would get his heart rate up, then shoot.  How many archers do YOU know, coach, that do this?  DO you teach this?  Kisik Lee, National Head Coach, has the Resident Athletes do this at the Chula Vista Olympic Training Center.  I have to wonder:  WHY in the world do we coaches follow the path he lays down in shooting technique yet FAIL our athletes by not having them follow ALL of the methods he uses?

Let’s go to the mattresses:  Get a copy of SPARK.  The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (John J. Ratey and Eric Hagerman).  Or, subscribe to my notes in Amazon Kindle, and zero in on the passages I extracted as relevant to archery coaching.

I’ll try to briefly summarize for you lazier folk<G>.  Children in one Chicago school district, over 17 years of doing this, who are led to exercise in a specific way at the beginning of their school day, in controlled study, are able to outscore like aged children in every country in the world in a standarized test (the TIMSS).  Nothing else special – no megabucks spent, just having them exercise. Google “Naperville TIMSS Singapore”  – singapore routinely cleans the clocks of American students in readin’,writin’,and ‘rithmatic.

Got to keep this short: When YOU exercise to 60-70% of max heart rate in a way that requires your brain engages for stability, dexterity, coordination, etc. then your brain releases glutamate, serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, GABA, and most importantly Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor. If you want the science of it, then read it. This book has it in spades – transparent, clearly said, easy to understand, scientific proof of a nature that is reliable enough to be acted on.

Again in short: With these chemicals cascading due to exercise, your brain chooses to use the “flight or fight syndrome” to lay down memory in a more powerful way.

Read that again as though your success as a coach depended on it.

Muscles exercising will create IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factor), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), and FGF-2 (fibroblast growth factor).  To be simplistic, these migrate to the brain and lay down more brain cells, more blood supply, and selectively myelinate the nerve pathways that are exercised immediately following …… aerobic exercise. If that happens to be shooting an arrow, the brain myelinizes better the skill of pointy stick into the gold, IF THE COACH IS DOING THE JOB A COACH SHOULD DO.

Ok, I’ve gone on long enough.  Get your students to exercise for 10 to 20 minutes before they shoot, and get their heart rates up to at least 120, maybe 160, depending on their age and their health.  Use prudence.  First, do no harm.  But like Easy, they will give you far more progess if you do this.  You will get credit you probably don’t realize you deserve.

Read Spark.  you will find it a great educational opportunity.  To get a taste of why it is pertinent to every archery coach, try this link.

Do some good today.  Make your students’ heart rates zoom before they shoot…